TBR: The Longest Books

Previously: The Longest Books I’ve Read | Coming Soon: The Most Fun We Ever Had Book Review

Recently I told you about the longest books which I have read. Since I enjoyed that so much I thought that I would do something similar but instead tell you about the longest books that I want to read.

The same rules as last time apply, so these are all stand alone books. I’m also not incding anthologyies, which is relaly only reelvant to the single anthology that I own, Lady it’s Cold Outisde and will be reading in December regardless. Coincidentally they are all books that I already own so I really have no excuse!

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1,037 pages- Gone With the Wind by Margaret Mitchell

I really like the 1939 film adaptation of Mitchell’s novel, starting Clark Gable and Vivienne Leigh. It’s the big reason that I bought a copy of this book. Gone With the Wind is a historical fiction novel falling Miss Scarlett O’Hara, a well-to-do heiress living in Georgia at the time of the American Civil War. I love Scarlet’s character on sceen and I’m dying to know how she comapres to Mitchell’s version of Scarlet.

1,017 pages- Bleak House by Charles Dickens

Honestly, I downloaded this kindle edition because I was on a Dickens downloading spree. I think it was around the time that I first read A Tale of Two Cities, which would have been around 2017. Beak House is such a popular Dickens novel, and yet I know nothing about the plot.

860 pages- Alexander Hamilton by Ron Chernow

I have three loves in my life. The first is reading, the second is Bucky Barnes, and the third is Hamilton: An American Musical. If you somehow don’t know what, or who Hamilton is, then Alexander Hamilton was one of the founding father’s of the United States. Although he played a crucial role in American history he died relatively early and faded into obscurity. Then one day, our lord and saviour Lin-Manuel Miranda picked up this Chernow biography as his holiday read and Hamilton: An American Musical was born. Of course being the super-nerd that I am I would like to read the source material.

836 pages- Vanity Fair by William Thackeray

I actually started reading Vanity Fair when I was either doing my GCSE’s or A-Levels, and still don’t know what it’s about. I think it might be about a girl, Becky Sharp, who wants to elevate her position in society? Regardless it seems like on of those books you “ought” to read, and one day I’m sure I will.

784 pages- The Romanovs: 1613-1918 by Simon Sebag Montefiore

Given that I very rarely read non-fiction it is somewhat surprising to see there are two non-fiction books on this list. This is a novel which, unsurpsingly, charts the rise and fall of the Romanov family, who rules Russian between 1613-1918. I may have mentioned before than Russian really fascinates me, and this particular book has a lovely cover so I boguht it.

Bonus Book:

771 pages- The Goldfinch by Donna Tartt

I remember The Goldfinch specifically because I was writing my Christmas list around the time of its release. I can remember seeing it in Waterstones and almost, almost, putting it on there even though I didn’t really know who Donna Tartt was. Now, in my old age I know that Tartt is the queen who gave us The Secret History. What a blessing! I did watch the recent 2019 film adaptation, and while I think I’m in the minors I really enjoy it so I’m hoping that the book will also give be the same feelings.

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Coming Soon: The Most Fun We Ever Had Book Review

In the meantime why not check out… Book Recommendations: The Longest Books I’ve Read, Book Review: How We Disappeared, or Book Review: Rules for Perfect Murders.

DDon’t forget you can follow me on Twitter, Instagram, and Goodreads to see what I’m currently reading.

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